“Just let the pumpkin spice people have their pumpkin spice in peace!” urges food writer Richard Gorelick about the surprisingly divisive topic that seems to be debated every October. Gorelick is a Baltimore County native and graduate of Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. He is also the host of Jmore’s “This Week in Baltimore Eating” on Facebook Live Thursdays at 12:30 p.m. Jmore presented Gorelick with 10 questions to help you get to know him better and see why you won’t want to miss a single episode!

This Week in Baltimore Eating

This Week in Baltimore Eating with Richard Gorelick at facebook.com/jmoreliving

Jmore: Why are you qualified to talk about Charm City’s food scene?

 
Gorelick: I learned a lot when I was the restaurant critic for The Baltimore Sun and before that The City Paper. The thing I was most proud of was being able to give the reader useful information about a dining experience while still remaining sympathetic to the men and women behind the meals. Most restaurants in Baltimore are small businesses — not multi-million dollar movies. I always have a better time when I approach a restaurant with a good attitude. I really encourage diners to go in with great expectations and a positive attitude.  
 
Where do you send out-of-towners when they ask for recommendations?
I love sending people to Henninger’s and Peter’s Inn in Fells Point. These are great, small restaurants that feel like Baltimore to me. The people who run them, and the people that patronize them, are wonderful representatives of our city. Yes, yes, I love the food at both of these places.
 

What’s your go-to spot for a late-night snack or a cheap eat?

Ha! I just realized that I hardly ever am out late at night looking for food. But on the rare occasions that I am, my go-to is still Nam Kang, the Korean restaurant on Maryland Avenue. My favorite cheap-eats places are both in Fells Point, both fairly new — Ekiben, an Asian spot with the best fried chicken in town, and Luchadoros, a family-owned Mexican restaurant.

Where do you think Baltimore ranks among foodie cities, especially in comparison to D.C. and Philly?

 I think our reputation falls below Washington’s and Philadelphia’s. I mean, I don’t think people outside of Baltimore know much about our restaurants and chefs. I love the idea that people will come here and be delighted and surprised. That’s much better than our not living up to a reputation, right? 

 In what ways do you think Baltimore’s dining scene has changed in the last decade?

So many restaurants are opening, so many, and I’m talking about big, bold, striving restaurants that rely on experienced staffs, both in the kitchen and on the floor, and a steady stream of supportive customers. I’m far from the only person who’s concerned that we’re beyond capacity.

What’s next in Jewish cooking?

Baltimore definitely has room for a new-old, return-to-tradition-but-make-it-new Jewish restaurant. Borscht with a twistbrisket served in steamed buns, kasha varnishkes with butternut squash (well, maybe not that, but you get the idea).

 What are some food trends you think are about to break out?

I think we’re going to see restaurants start promoting the kind of preparations and experiences you can only get in a restaurant. That might mean more table-side preparation. Think Peking duck, Steak Diane and Baked Alaska. Just try ordering any of those by delivery!

What’s the one food trend you think is ridiculous?

I think I’ve had the same answer for 15 years — wraps.

Death row meal?

Lasagna, with slightly burned noodles and rum raisin ice cream.

What’s the strangest job you’ve ever held?

I briefly worked for a trucking company in Baltimore. I think I was responsible for sending information about the driver to payroll. I know I didn’t drive a truck.

Watch the debut episode of This Week in Baltimore Eating now…

Also see: Cousins in the Catskills

Go to facebook.com/JMORELiving every Thursday at 12:30 p.m. to watch This Week in Baltimore Eating with Richard Gorelick, sponsored by Eddie’s of Roland Park Join the discussion on all things food-related.

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