When:
March 23, 2019 – April 16, 2019 all-day
2019-03-23T00:00:00-04:00
2019-04-17T00:00:00-04:00
Where:
The Gordon Center
3506 Gwynnbrook Ave
Owings Mills, MD 21117
USA
Cost:
Individual screenings are $13 in advance, $15 at the door; Subscribe to all 10 for $120
Baltimore Jewish Film Festival @ The Gordon Center | Owings Mills | Maryland | United States

The BJFF presents internationally renowned Jewish-interest films.

Here’s this year’s schedule:

March 23, 8 p.m.: “The Last Suit” — An 88-year-old Jewish tailor runs away from Buenos Aires to Poland seeking a friend he hasn’t seen in 70 years.

March 26, 7 p.m.: “And Then She Arrived” — An easy-going nerd tries to win the love of a waitress from Jerusalem.

March 28, 7 p.m.: “Budapest Noir” — It’s 1936 in Hungary and a girl is found dead with only a Jewish prayer book in her purse. Includes special guest Christopher Reed from Stevenson University.

April 4, 7 p.m.: “Winter Hunt” — A young vigilante confronts a former Auschwitz guard accused of war crimes.

April 7, 1 p.m.: “Azimuth” — In June 1967, a day after the Israeli/Egyptian Six Day War cease-fire, an Israeli sergeant and an Egyptian soldier each have one goal: survival.

April 7, 4 p.m.: “Shoelaces” — After the death of his mother, an adult with a cognitive disability is forced to move in with his estranged father.

April 9, 7 p.m.: “The Light of Hope” — Based on the true story of Elisabeth Eidenbenz, a young Red Cross nurse transforms an old French villa into a birth clinic and saves the lives of mothers and children from the Nazis and Franco’s regime in Spain. With special guest Rebecca Boehling of UMBC.

April 11, 7 p.m.: “Fractures” — The film takes place in a single day in which the life of a professor and his family unravels.

April 14, 3 p.m.: “Carl Laemmle” — This is the story of the man who founded Universal Pictures and saved more than 300 Jewish refugee families from Nazi Germany. With special guest Linda DeLibero of Johns Hopkins University.

April 16, 7 p.m.: “The Invisibles” — In June 1943, Germany declared Berlin “free of Jews” while there were still 7,000 living in the city. This film recounts the stories of four of the survivors.